Anyone Selling Quality Captive Zebras (L046)

If you are a private seller, then why not give this a shot? It's free and might even have some of those zebra thingies! You can also post requests for exchanging or loaning fish. Please refrain from posting opinions or irrelevancies in this section.

Zebrapleco.com can not take ANY responsibility for items advertised or sold in this section as they are free classifieds. Members not following the Forum Rules however will have their Posts deleted.

User avatar
NeoCult
Mentally Certified!
Posts: 693
Joined: Tue May 31, 2005 10:56 pm
Location: Stirling, Scotland...
Contact:

Post by NeoCult »

i have noticed my wild caught dont come out much at all and the captive breds seem interested in what im doing and chasing each other around a fair bit..
10x L046 Zebs for now, more coming soon ;) 6x L199 Plecos, 6x L129 Plecos, 45x Cardinals, corys & shrimps

Check My Blog - http://zebrapleco.net
platty252
Forum Follower
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue May 31, 2005 9:11 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Post by platty252 »

My apalogies Adam, i must have been miles away when i wrote that thread.
My LFS (about 10 miles away) informes me that they were L046 on the list as they have been chaceing them for some time now.
Adam
Moderator
Posts: 1604
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 2:50 pm
Location: London, UK

Post by Adam »

Plastic Mac, if you're careful to not breed related offspring together then I doubt that new blood in the form of F0s would be needed. When this all takes off there should be "plenty" of non related captive bred zebras knocking about that breeders can swap so as to maintain a healthy gene pool. Hopefully at some point there will no longer be the need to collect zebras from the wild, a bit hypocritical of me really considering that all of my adult zebras are F0s but I guess you have to start somewhere. There are many other species of fish that are seldomly collected from the wild as breeders are able to supply the trade with captive bred fish.

F0=wild caught.
F1=first generation captive bred.
F2=second generation captive bred.
F3=third generation captive bred.................

If I remeber correctly the F# terminology originates from reptile breeders and has been adopted by fish breeders. Using WC and CB is ok initially but the F# system helps to identify subsequent generations of captive breds.

Platty252, I have never heard of zebras being exported via Peru. :? Perhaps this is how exporters are getting around the current zebra embargo.

Adam
AndyAps.com
Obsessed!!
Posts: 163
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2005 9:57 am
Location: Sheffield UK
Contact:

Hi Nesolb

Post by AndyAps.com »

Hi Nesolb, Remember me??

Can i just ask what you paid for the zebra's you recently purchased?
I have a breeding group of 5 and am thinking about selling them but don't know how much to let them go for.??
success is a journey full of unbelievable experiance NOT a destination with an unbelievable experiance.
platty252
Forum Follower
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue May 31, 2005 9:11 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Post by platty252 »

Hay Mark the Peru thing was my mistake not the shops. My mind was elsewere when typing the thred. My appolagies for the confusion.
Shell231
Mentally Certified!
Posts: 650
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2005 11:49 am
Location: St Leonards on sea E Sussex

Post by Shell231 »

he has a point u know!
User avatar
Barbie
Moderator
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2004 9:07 pm
Location: Spokane, WA, US
Contact:

Post by Barbie »

F stands for Filial generation and the cichlid world occasionally gets their undies in a real bunch discussing it's proper usage. Basically the purists want it to be G1 for generations removed from wild, but the F has been around long enough it's "recognized" so people don't tend to change.

While I do think it's extremely important that we track the heritage of these fish, so that we can avoid inbreeding 10 years down the line, I know that Labidochromis caeruleus is a fish that exploded in the hobby 10 years ago or so. There was one single pair taken from the lake, and all of the fish in the hobby were descendants of those fish until just the last year or two. They're capable of reproducing at about 5 months with proper care, so you can see just how many generations it's possible were out there. An outcross with an unrelated male into second generation fry would be more than adequate to infuse new genetics. They don't consider it line breeding even until the 3rd generation back into related animals, let alone inbreeding.

Keeping in mind I already have spare males to cross back on any females I might eventually grow out, it does at least make for an interesting discussion ;).

Barbie
[url=http://www.plecos.com][img]http://plecos.com/plecosbanner.gif[/img][/url]
User avatar
LyreTail
Obsessed!!
Posts: 137
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 5:28 am
Location: Everett, WA USA

Post by LyreTail »

Actually there is no such thing as an "F0" generation. The so called "F0" generation is actually called the "P1" , "P" or "Parent generation" and this does NOT mean or have anything to do with "wild caught generation" as some people mistaken. The filial generation system is only for determining how much a fish, plant or other animal has been inbred. There really should be no arguement as to the usage of "Filial Generations" since it is a scientific term that has a set definition. I think an Austrian monk name Mendal coined this system in the later part of the 1800's and did expierements on pea plants

http://hal.weihenstephan.de/genglos/asp ... asp?nr=339

Any two unrelated fish that are spawned together are the "P" generation and all inbreeding from there is considered F1, F2, F3 etc. After F2 you really should mix a new parent in and start over with a new P generation. The first Filial Generation is all the offspring from the "P" generation ( all brothers and sisters, but not inbred) . The second Filial generation is the offspring from two of the offspring from the first Filial generation ( 1st inbreeding stage)

What really gets confusing is when you mix partially related off spring.
Say you mix a parent with a child- that would only be a 50% relation and not considered an "F2" generation since F2's have parents that are 100% related. Probably easier to just start a full new P generation but it is always not possible to find a new mate

Or Say you had two genetic lines going and they both started out with a single female. You breed the two lines down 3 generations and in the 2nd generation added a new and different male to each of the two lines. You take one male and one female from each of the two the 3rd generation and breed them together. I am not sure if you could consider these a new P generation or not. Their relation has been diluted to by about 25% or more so it is not like breeding a brother and sister such as an in a F1 generation. You might be able to consider these a new "P" generation
User avatar
gtp
Groupie
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:27 pm
Location: Great Britain

Post by gtp »

I am selling a 1" one a couple of adverts below if your interested. Captive bred. Open to offers.
fishboy
Groupie
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 11:40 am
Location: Wichita,ks

Post by fishboy »

It is really sad about what happened to the labs, isn't barbie. Really the correct term is G1, and i was in a discussion about this on another forum. With the yellow labs, i plan on raising my own line bred group, selective breeding only the best. I figure it will take me 3 years to get some good stock, because from birth i can raise a mbuna to spawn at 4 months, especially with yellow labs as they spawn at 1.5 inches. If only zebras could spawn in 4 months.....
User avatar
LyreTail
Obsessed!!
Posts: 137
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 5:28 am
Location: Everett, WA USA

Post by LyreTail »

I have been through a lot of websites / forums and the myth that filial generation denotes how far removed offspring are from wild caught parents is pervasive. I encourage you to look through university and science websites for the proper information and definition.

The simple fact is that you do not know if the so called "wild caught" generation were not siblings to begin with. Wild caught generations are not necessarily more valuable in a breeding program because you have no idea what they were exposed to when growing up or how much inbreeding has already occurred. Lack of food, drought, toxic substances in the water etc. Some previously line bred fish can also have some better traits to work with, such as longer finnage or different color morphs that you might want to start your new "P" generation with.

Many times captive bred fish are more robust and more comfortable with breeding in the aquarium. This is just proven fact.

There is no basis to say "the proper term is "G1" as I have never seen this numerology system used in any scientific papers. If you can find it in a dependable science or university website, then I would like to read such info.

http://www.sirinet.net/~jgjohnso/genetics.html

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~cbbc/courses/ ... etics.html
Post Reply